DIY Drain Maintenance

Post by John Wilson


Clogged drains can happen pretty regularly in the home.   Bу and large, the occurance of blocked drains can bе limited by regular upkeep and some awareness. Regular upkeep goes far to keep your drains in great working condition.  Whеn performed on a regular basis, іt can help ѕраrе уоu соѕtѕ іn home maintenance bills.  Thе following are 5 DIY tips to help keep your drains in great condition.

Food Deposits

This is probably the most common reason for drain blockages in the kitchen.  To make this a less infrequent occurrence it is always a best practice to clear all your plates and dishes before putting them in the dishwasher.  This will keep all the food remainders from getting stuck in your dishwasher drain.  It’s also a best practice to run hot water down your drain after rinsing all of your dishes.  Its also a great idea to use a sifter to catch food from the rinsing before it goes into the drain.  For all the food that does end up down in the drain, using a grinding disposer helps to puree the waste so that it rinses down the drain easier.  Without a disposer, full chunks can get down into the drain and cause a major blockage.

Fluids

Some fluids have a tendency to harden up and cause a blockage when they sit inside the drain for a long time.  This can happen in both Kitchen drains and Bathroom drains.  Some of the common liquids that do this are grease from pans, toothpaste, liquids with food in them (rice, pasta) and heavy liquids.  The best thing to do is eliminate or reduce how much of these liquids go down the drain by throwing them into the garbage can.

Flush It With Hot Water!

Drains love hot water!  Especially kitchen drains that tend to accumulate food residue and grease.  Hot water softens up blockages, grease and and oils.  It helps to counteract the buildup of these negative things.  Now “hot” is a relative term.  This doesn’t mean that you should go boil a few gallons of water and pour it down there, you’ll likely melt any plastic drains you have!  But most homeowners only have their hot water tanks heating between 95-115 Degrees Fahrenheit, not quite hot enough!  So the best practice for this is heating up water for just a few minutes for about 140 Degrees, and then pouring it down!  Making this a regular practice will help keep those kitchen drains nice and clean.

Controlling the Hair!

Hold on to your wigs Guys and Gals, hair is one of the most common clogger of drains!  When we go out to clean out a drain in a bathroom it is nearly always a problem caused by holdup of hair!  It never seems like much of a problem when a hair or two goes down the drain but they tend to get caught on everything like the drain stopper, the bends in the drain, and other slight blockages so then after a few months of not being diligent it gets all clogged up!  The best practice for this is to try to reduce the amount of hair that goes down any of your bathroom drains.  You can do this by using either strainers on tub/shower drains, wiping up hair in the sink with a tissue instead of rinsing it down, 

Sink Plunger/Hand Drain Machines

Drain cleaning equipment is really expensive!  We invest heavily in all the right equipment to take care of tough blockages fast and effectively.  But that doesn't mean that you can't set up your own little in-house drain cleaning tool center with just a few bucks so you can call us out only when you get in over your head!  The best tools to put in here would be just a sink plunger to take care of those little clogs, and if you're really feeling ambitious, a hand crank drain machine.  I wouldn't recommend most people using an electronic one without the help of someone experienced because they do have some torque to them and the cable can wrap around your hand or arm if you’re not careful and really do some damage to you or the home around you.


Here is a video to help you use the hand crank machine from one of the largest drain machine manufactures in the states: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kwkHKd9RMUU 

 

And here is a video on how to use a sink plungerhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VCd0d6hjsDc